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Letters: A baffling disconnect

Climate scientists say that rising production of natural gas is emerging as one of the biggest drivers of climate change
fortisbc tilbury lng plant delta, bc canada

Editor:
I was struck by the baffling disconnect between two articles in your Sep. 29 issue.

On page 4 the article, titled, City seeks senior government cash to prepare for rising seas, describes the City of Delta’s plans to raise Delta’s dikes, with assistance from upper level governments, in preparation to face the climate crisis.

Ten pages further on the article titled, FortisBC’s LNG project draws fire from opponents, states that the municipal government of Delta has not expressed opposition to the Tilbury expansion. (Vancouver, Richmond, New Westminster, and Port Moody have). The expansion of the Tilbury FortisBC plant brings Delta into the global industry expansion of LNG use.
Natural gas combustion produces less CO2 than burning coal or diesel. This apparent benefit is negated by the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in the extraction (fracking), transportation, and processing of natural gas. Climate scientists say that rising production of natural gas is emerging as one of the biggest drivers of climate change.
The City of Delta has entrapped itself, believing that raising dikes will offset economic benefit from processing fossil fuels. This lack of imagination has been called the “Great Derangement” by Amitav Ghosh. Voters in the upcoming municipal election should ask their candidates their opinions on FortisBC’s LNG project.

Kathy Bossort

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