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Letters: Once damage is done, there is no going back

The habitat compensation strategies proposed to date have been extensively analyzed by experts and will not stop this destruction
T2 proposal delta, bc
T2 would provide 2.4 million TEUs (20-foot equivalent units) of additional container capacity annually.

Editor:

As we look up to see the wonder of millions of migratory birds passing overhead this fall, we need to consider the value of the Fraser River delta on the Pacific coast, where we are so fortunate to live and work.

It cannot be overestimated as it is a major migratory bird crossover for millions of birds from 20 countries and three continents. Birds stop for critical refueling during migrations that can be more than 2,500 km. Nearly the entire world’s population of Western Sandpipers stops here, and more than 35 shorebird species, many endangered, rely on the estuary through the year. In addition, the estuary is the rearing area for the largest runs of Pacific salmon, which are vital to the survival of our Southern Resident killer whale population.

The proposed expansion of the Roberts Bank terminal (RBT2), although approved by the federal government in spite of its own scientists’ assessment that it will be an unmitigable disaster for wildlife, has yet to be approved by the provincial government. Consider the effect of pouring more than 270 acres of concrete into the middle of the estuary. In addition to the massive increase of underwater noise, light and environmental pollution, the physical decrease in the size of the estuary will present insurmountable problems for wildlife.

The habitat compensation strategies proposed to date have been extensively analyzed by experts and will not stop this destruction. Once the damage is done, there is no going back. It’s not too late! Contact your MLA today. Your voice matters.

Debra Probert