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Delta author tackles fake news and PTSD in pair of new novels

With the winter chill on its way, now is a great time to curl up in your favourite chair and enjoy a good book. Delta author K.L. Denman has a pair of new novels suitable for readers young and old.
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Delta author K.L. Denman has a pair of new novels out suitable for both a teen and adult audience.

With the winter chill on its way, now is a great time to curl up in your favourite chair and enjoy a good book.

Delta author K.L. Denman has a pair of new novels suitable for readers young and old.

The first one, Faster Than Truth, is a contemporary novel for ages 13 and up that explores today’s complex media landscape and its impact on the mental health of teens.

The protagonist, 16-year-old Declan, dreams of becoming a professional reporter, an international correspondent who travels the world covering big stories, but Declan is still in high school, and as editor of his school paper, he covers school dances – not exactly “news.”

Declan gets his chance for a big scoop when a student who goes by the name of Smoke shows him part of an email written by the principal. The email discusses implanting students with microchips.

Outraged at the idea, Declan publishes a story about the scheme online without taking the time to do additional research or fact checking. The story goes viral … with unfortunate consequences.

Denman released the book in May. She said so far the reviews have been positive.

“People have said it’s timely for the subject matter,” said Denman. “It really is a story of coping with the media and how different that landscape is and trying to find the truth of what is out there. My concern to write the novel grew out of the idea of ‘fake news’ and our desire to really source out what is going on. To hear how journalists are being denigrated troubles me. Journalists should be held to account, but it’s a profession that should be valued and appreciated.”

Coming Back, which was released in August, is a short novel and a shift from middle grades and young adults to adult fiction.

The novel tells the story of Julie who has survived a horrific car accident, but she has no memory of the event or the boyfriend who was with her in the car. He disappeared, and she is diagnosed with PTSD.

Her doctor recommends a therapy animal, and Julie chooses to get a horse. Julie’s experience with horses is limited, but it’s empowering to finally be involved in life again, and her symptoms abate.

However, she has a lot to learn, and when the riding coach gives confusing lessons, Julie is thrown off balance, both emotionally and in the saddle. The improvement she’d begun to experience with her PTSD symptoms is lost, and her nightmares return.

“I’ve spent a lot of time with horses throughout my life and volunteered in therapeutic riding efforts, so I see the value in this and was curious to learn more about PTSD,” she said. “It was all that and my curiosity that brought this all together. So far some very good reviews as well, so I’m happy about that.”

Denman was born in Calgary and spent most of her childhood there. She loved reading, writing, animals, music and the outdoors.

She moved to Delta as a teen and moved around a bit in her adult years, before returning to Delta eight years ago.

You can find out more on the author and her books on Facebook or Twitter @kldenman or on her website at www.kldenman.com.

 

 

 




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