Retired RCMP officer helping protect soft targets with weapons detection system

Kal Malhi continues to draw on his police background for public safety products.

The now-retired RCMP officer took a company public on the stock exchange back in 2016. Patriot One Technologies Inc. has since graduated from the junior exchange to the main TSX.

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The Ladner resident recently helped list on Canadian Securities Exchange another concealed weapons detection company called First Responder Technologies, which is developing concealed weapon detection tools using WiFi signals.

The WiFi-based concealed weapons detection system is focused on protecting the perimeter of soft targets, such as places of worship, theatres, shopping centres and sports venues, where the public is most vulnerable to acts of terrorism and mass shootings.

Mahli, who is chairman of First Responder Technologies, is the founder and chairman of Bullrun and deeply involved in the capital markets. Bullrun is involved in the advancement of technologies in the interest of universal benefit.

Malhi has been instrumental in raising capital for various projects totaling in excess of $150 million since 2008.

“Ever since I launched Patriot One, I have been working towards further technologies that would help with public safety,” he said. “I’ve been working closely with universities who are looking at law enforcement technologies, funding them and eventually taking them public onto the Canadian exchanges.”

Malhi said he came across the technology being further developed by First Responder in 2017 at Rutgers University.

“When I looked at it and saw the technology was leading edge using WiFi, which is low cost that doesn’t require much in the way of government approvals, I licensed it and we have been developing it ever since,” he said. “Now we have gone public and started trading on the CSE.”

Malhi said he has a passion for law enforcement technologies and wants to ensure governments and law enforcement agencies have the best tools possible.

“There isn’t a lot of capital out there to help develop these law enforcement technologies because there are not a lot of people like myself who understand the business opportunity as well as the opportunity as a tool for law enforcement,” he said. “Combining the two and getting it funded has worked well for me. I think there is a niche there and I have been able to serve that niche with several of the technologies that we have had.”

He said all of the products have been well received by law enforcement.

“They understand the technology and they invest in that as well,” he added.

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